Internationale Kurzfilmtage Oberhausen

Award
Winners
2011

Jury of the International Competition 2011

© Kurzfilmtage / Daniel Gasenzer

Sari Volanen (Finland)

William E. Jones (USA)

Branka Benčić (Croatia)

Joan Legalamitlwa (South Africa)

Michael Glawogger (Austria)

 


Grand Prize of the City of Oberhausen (7,500 €)

Sans-titre

Neil Beloufa

France 2010, 15', HDCAM, colour

 

 

 

 

Statement
In Sans-titre, we hear about a group of terrorists who occupied a villa and trashed the place. What we see suggests other things entirely: suspicions give rise to strange dreams; architectural space can be produced by an ink jet printer; we know nothing. Neil Beloufa has made an uncanny and original film.


Principal Prize (3,500 € each)

The Artist

Laure Prouvost

Great Britain 2010, 10', Digi Beta, colour

 

 

 

 

 

Statement
"Snap" - and just like that, she's got us: Dynamic, rhythmic, fresh, witty, frenetic and silly in a funny way; an out of this world studio visit from hell. We are delighted to present the 2nd principal prize to Laure Prouvost for The Artist.


Principal Prize (3,500 €)

Mercúrio

(Mercury)

Sandro Aguilar

Portugal 2010, 18', 35 mm, colour

 

 

 

Statement
Mercúrio
opens up an unexpected visual landscape by showing the intimate encounter of two people through glass that turns into a strange half mirror that reflects reflections, and turns around the inside and the outside world in a visual and emotional way. As Goethe put it: "Nichts ist drinnen, nichts ist draußen, denn was innen ist, ist außen."


ARTE Prize for a European Short Film (2,500 €)

TSE

(Out)

Roee Rosen

Israel 2010. 34'30'', HDCAM, colour

 

 

Statement
The ARTE Prize goes to TSE by Roee Rosen for the excellence of the act of exorcism, for the coat hanger abortion, for a staged documentary, a documental fiction, a dubbed, synched, shouted, sung and vibrant sound, and for the paintings.


Special Mention of the international jury

I'm Not the Enemy

Bjørn Melhus

Germany 2011, 13', HDCAM, colour

 

 

 

 

Statement
With this Special Mention, the jury would like to raise awareness of works in moving images made by visual artists. From American film history, Bjørn Melhus appropriates a list of films about Vietnam veterans and transfers them to a non-American (German) setting. Extracting the films' dialogue from the original contexts, the alienation effect of I'm Not the Enemy makes us aware of cracks in the surface of society.


Prize of the Jury of the Ministry for Family, Children, Youth, Culture and Sport of North Rhine-Westphalia (5,000 €)

Sans-titre

Neil Beloufa

France 2010, 15', HDCAM, colour

 

 

 

 

Statement
Neil Beloufa's untitled work reveals only at second glance that the modernist architecture of its location is made of paper and paint. Protagonists moving in semi-darkness, truncated, reduced to their social status and respective language, in which they deliver fragments of a whole which the recipient can never quite assemble into a coherent narrative. Control and clear interpretations are impossible. Assumptions and contradictions irritate, the inexplicable rest of this cinematic work of art, realised in congenial aesthetic form, opens a space for thought that enables reflection at a distance and whose universal themes and dynamics, like habit, power and hierarchical structures, have a lasting effect.

 

Members of the Jury

Barbara Engelbach (Cologne), Susanne Grüneklee (Cologne), Kyra Scheurer (Berlin), Ruth Schiffer (Düsseldorf), Anna Wahle (Cologne)


Special Mention

Three Walls

Zaheed Mawani

Canada 2011, 25'30'', HDCAM, colour

 

 

 

 

Statement
Three Walls tells the story of the rise of the office cubicle - a system of walls that divides open space offices into small booths. The film lets architects, furniture manufacturers and motivation coaches speak and pits them against the people who have to work in these cubicles. In clearly designed frames and with well-chosen protagonists, the film manages to create a narrative arc from architecture through the meaning of work to the post-industrial service society's attitude to life. It is ironic and angry and leaves us with a sharper eye for the relationship between humans, functions and space.

 

Members of the Jury

Barbara Engelbach (Cologne), Susanne Grüneklee (Cologne), Kyra Scheurer (Berlin), Ruth Schiffer (Düsseldorf), Anna Wahle (Cologne)


The International Critics' Prize (FIPRESCI Prize)

Handebol

(Handball)

Anita Rocha de Silveira

Brazil 2010, 19'30'', 35 mm, colour

 

 

 

Statement
For its melancholy and unflinching look at the life of a teenage girl, and its slightly unreal atmosphere that is captivating from beginning to end.

 

Members of the Jury

Gabriele Barrera (Italy), Joost Broeren (Netherlands), Rolf-Rüdiger Hamacher (Germany)


Prize of the Ecumenical Jury (1,500 €)

Atrophy

Palesa Shongwe

South Africa 2009, 8', Digi Beta, colour

 

 


Statement
Atrophy
is a successful combination of dance, poetry, music and documentary. A young South African woman expresses her longing for freedom through a dance that creates a feeling of community and evokes her cultural tradition. At the same time she fears that the space she unfolds through dancing will become more and more constricted due to the conditions of life in the townships. The rhythm of the body creates spaces that resist these growing social limitations.

 

Members of the Jury

Manfred Burger (Hamburg), Natalie Resch (Graz, Österreich), Werner Schneider-Quindeau (Frankfurt/M.), Eberhard Streier (Essen)


Prize of the International Short Film Festival Oberhausen (500 €)

Kengere

Peter Turkei Muhumuza

Uganda 2010, 22'30'', DV, colour and b/w

 

 

 

 

Statement
The Prize of the International Short Film Festival Oberhausen goes to Kengere by Peter Tukei Muhumuza. The film is impressive in the care, intelligence and delicacy, the imagination with which it creates a handmade world of its own – a world in which massive human rights abuse is part of everyday life, as we learn slowly but surely. It is a congenial fusion of animation and documentation.


Zonta Prize (500 €) to a female filmmaker in the International or German Competition

99 Beautiful

Tessa Knapp

Germany 2010, 17', HDACM, colour

 

 

 

 

 

Statement
Names reach back further than nations. The filmmaker creates an austere formal frame in which the names of Turkish people reveal more about their lives than their immediate social environment. The piece finds a highly plausible format at the intersection between short film and installation.


Prize for the best contribution to the German Competition (5,000 €)

Traces of an Elephant

Vanessa Nica Mueller Germany/Great Britian 2011, 27', Digi Beta, colour

 

 

 

 


Statement
Purposeful steps and movements through empty rooms, their rhythmic sequence creating a hypnotic pull, redundancy and absence forming a subtle threat. The presence and force of these images is juxtaposed with the fragmentary and dreamlike quality of memories – a new film emerges. In her simple and efficient adaptation of Alan Clark's "Elephant" Vanessa Nica Mueller manages to create a multi-layered reflection on memory as the zone of transition between reconstruction and re-telling. Traces of an Elephant is superimposed over the original like a second layer and expands into a personal document of a city between stagnation and change.

 

Members ot the Jury

Markus Ambach (Düsseldorf), Esther Buss (Berlin), Dore O. (Mülheim an der Ruhr)


3sat Promotional Award (2,500 €) for a contribution with a particularly innovative approach. In addition the award includes a buying option on the awarded work to be broadcast on 3sat

marxism today (prologue)

Phil Collins

Germany 2010, 25'30'', HDACM, colour

 

 

 

Statement
Biographies marked by violent upheavals, triggered by history. A state and its "body politic" disappear and take a whole superstructure of ideas and philosophies with them. The people affected by this – people who taught social studies or Marxism-Leninism in the GDR– must re-invent their lives. But what happens to the ideological and perhaps even idealistic residue, where does it go? In his visually impressive montage of interviews and archive material, which has nothing to do with conventional nostalgia for or denunciation of East Germany, Phil Collins designs an intense portrait of an era and moves far beyond conventional ideas of documentary realism.

 

Members ot the Jury

Markus Ambach (Düsseldorf), Esther Buss (Berlin), Dore O. (Mülheim an der Ruhr)


Special Mention

ich fahre mit dem fahrrad in einer halben stunde an den rand der atmosphäre

Michael Klöfkorn

Germany 2010, 10', HDACM, colour and b/w

 

Statement
A wild bicycle ride full of associations during which the cyclist encounters economic theories, militarist madness, the psychoanalysis of the Berlin victory column and other thunderstorms.

 

Members ot the Jury

Markus Ambach (Düsseldorf), Esther Buss (Berlin), Dore O. (Mülheim an der Ruhr)


NRW-Jury 2011

Ute Mader (Leverkusen)

Gabi Hinderberger (Bochum)

Dirk Steinkühler (Köln)


First Prize of the NRW Competition (1,000 €), sponsored by the NRW Bank

How To Rise The Moon

Anja Struck

Germany/Denmark 2011, 8'30'', 35 mm, b/w

 

 

 

 

Statement
Inspired by various schools of cultural and art history, the director creates a disturbing, atmospheric and condensed assemblage of unusual images whose source is a well-stocked personal depository. The black and white animation is very open, which allows a number of interpretations and emotional responses, but which leaves the audience suspended between certainty and uncertainty.


Second Prize of the NRW Competition (500 €), sponsored by the NRW Bank

Der Mond ist ein schöner Ort

Anne Maschlanka/Viktoria Gurtovaj

Germany 2011, 15', DV, colour

 

 

 

 

 

Statement
An approach to a comparatively unknown country and a young protagonist who shows us different sides of her life. Her everyday routines are marked by her parents' experiences; the consequences of the civil war and the difficulties of starting again can be seen and experienced in the images and words. The directors manage to gain the girl's trust very quickly; the camera follows her closely and is even wielded by her, emphasizing this remarkable documentary's clear perspective and closeness to its subject.


Prize of the Children's Jury of the International Children' Competition (1,000 €), sponsored by Neue Ruhr Zeitung

Mobile

Verena Fels

Germany 2010, 6'30'', Digi Beta, colour

 

 


Statement
Our first prize goes to a film which we all found very funny. We liked the bright colours and the music. There is wild movement and lots of action. The film shows that even if you feel lonely, there is always a friend somewhere. The film is made quite lovingly and beautifully, and very suitable for small kids, too.

 

Members of the Jury

Markus Haack 10, Eva Pauline Lehmann 9, Selma Musevic 11, Paramvir Singh Dhillon 9, Sven Torben Kempkes 9


Special Mention

Haru no ogawa

(The Spring Brook)

Sakichi Sato

Japan 2010, 6'30'', DVCAM, colour

 

 

Statement
We awarded a Special Mention to the film Haru no ogawa, because this film is very funny, full of ideas and imagination. The film shows us a different country and a different way of life. We also liked the song in this film very much.

 

Members of the Jury

Markus Haack 10, Eva Pauline Lehmann 9, Selma Musevic 11, Paramvir Singh Dhillon 9, Sven Torben Kempkes 9


Prize of the Youth Jury of the International Children's and Youth Film Competition (1,000 €), supported by the Sir Peter Ustinov Foundation

Små barn, stora ord

(Little Children, Big Words)
Lisa James Larsson

Sweeden 2009, 12', 35 mm, colour

 

 

Statement
We agreed almost unanimously that this film must be the winner. The film made a lasting impression on us. It made us think and we discussed it for a long time. Children often ask the most difficult questions. That's what a primary school teacher learns when she suddenly has to answer unexpected questions. The answer to these questions was very touching. The many close-ups of her face enabled us to really understand her emotions. We were also impressed with the acting – especially the children's.

 

Members of the Jury

Jasmin Bunk 16, Vivien Hüsemann 15, Monique Mencke 16, Emilia Minasyan 18, Vicky Schlosser 16

 

Preamble

We saw 26 short films in the past few days which took us to many different countries and cultures. The films were very varied, sometimes instructive, sometimes moving, entertaining, unusual, sometimes hard to understand. But we definitely liked every single film in its own way.


Special Mention

Naiá a a lua

(Naiá and the Moon)

Leandro Tadashi

Brazil 2010, 13', HDV, colour and b/w

 

 

Statement
We were told many stories and there's one we liked particularly well: the Brazilian legend of the Jaci and how the stars were put in the sky. Naiá is enthralled by the stories told by the elders of the tribe around the fire and so fascinated by the moon that she wants to be close to it, like the stars. Our Special Mention goes to Naiá e a lua, because this adaptation of the legend really impressed us. We follow Naiá through the jungle as if we were there. The music, the images and the brilliant colours all enthralled us and taught us a little about Brazilian culture.

 

Members of the Jury

Jasmin Bunk 16, Vivien Hüsemann 15, Monique Mencke 16, Emilia Minasyan 18, Vicky Schlosser 16


13th MuVi Award for the Best German Music Video, First Prize (2,500 €)

One Minute Soundsculpture

Daniel Franke (Music: Ryoji Ikeda)

Germany 2010, 1', Full HD Pro Res, colour

 

 

Statement
You couldn't make a more successful video clip than Daniel Franke's interpretation of Ryoji Ikeda's piece One Minute Soundsculpture. Once you have seen this film, you will never be able to listen to the track again without seeing those video images in your mind. Franke illustrates a short piece of electroacoustic music – a sequence of static noise and test sounds – with the picture of an empty, square gallery space. Abstract forms emerge out of nothing to mutate into animated lines, which in turn mutate into an abstract creature that grows, floats and moves to the rhythm of the sounds. The sound sculpture turns into a visual sculpture, cause and effect merge until sound and image become indistinguishable. The aesthetic principle of the video clip – the perfect fusion of image and sound – is taken to a supreme level of perfection; and he does it with the most brilliant pictures we have seen in a long time.

 

Members of the jury
Jens Balzer
(Germany), Ingibjörk Birgisdóttir (Iceland), Phoenix Perry (USA)


2nd Prize (1,500 €)

There Will Be Singing

Jutojo and Philip Sollmann (Music: Efdemin)

Germany 2010, 6', Full HD Pro Res, colour

 

 

Statement
At first glance, the video for Efdemin's There Will Be Singing seems like the simple and direct visualisation of a techno track, based on a geometric visual language: straight 4-to-the-floor beats meet the uniformity of modernist high-rise architecture. A kind of music that seems to tell no story and have no history. But wait! A second glance reveals that the high-rises were filmed from old, yellowing, tattered illustrated books on architecture. They are pictures of Chicago in the 1950s, which Efdemin combines with a tribute to the Chicago House and Detroit Techno of the 1980s and 90s. The historical references are superseded by nostalgia; nostalgia is superseded by horror at the brutality, the hostile emptiness of these old city panoramas. The camera zooms in so close that the photos seem to come alive, yet the only truly animated movement you see in this film is a hand that turns a page covered in post-it notes. It is only its musical appropriation that makes this visual world come alive in retrospect, to a life that it never really possessed. This is the magnificent, touching message visualised in this video clip with great skill and formal severity.

 

Members of the jury
Jens Balzer
(Germany), Ingibjörk Birgisdóttir (Iceland), Phoenix Perry (USA)


3rd Prize (1,000 €)

Ah!

Darko Dragicevic (Music:Oval)

Germany 2010, 3', Full HD Pro Res, colour

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statement
Darko Dragicevic's video for Oval's track Ah! is fascinating in the consequence and elegance with which a radically disembodied kind of music is translated into physical movement. Moreover, the director manages to translate a basically unerotic piece of music into pictures of multiple desire. The female dancer dominates her male fellow dancers on the one hand and is cornered by their looks and desires again and again on the other hand. The delicacy of the music and its heavy, earthy character are both reflected in the video, which looks like a still life in which there is dancing. A clip that raises more questions than it answers.

 

Members of the jury
Jens Balzer
(Germany), Ingibjörk Birgisdóttir (Iceland), Phoenix Perry (USA)


The winner of the MuVi Online Audience Award is chosen by Internet users who cast their votes at www.muvipreis.de (in co-operation with 3sat, Intro, tape.tv, byte.fm and ARTE creative)

Bagetelle l

Sebastian Huber, Robert Pohle and Johannes Timpernagel (Music: sonic.art)

Germany 2011, 1'30'', DV, colour